Upgraded / Redesigned FSI Cam Follower – Aftermarket

1/22/12 Just a quick warning: this company may not be as legitimate as the VW community thinks. Several Mazda websites do not have fond memories of this particular company. I’ll have to find more information…Stay away for now.

Update: 8/2014

Nothing has proven to be as good as just replacing or checking the cam follower periodically. I’ve been lucky with the wear so it’s far easier for me to not worry about it. Unfortunately, there are a variety of factors that contribute to what kind of wear you see and your experience may vary wildly. Keep on top of your oil changes and keep track of your follower wear!

For the past few months, the company HPFP Upgrade has been working on creating a cam follower that is more durable than the oem piece. Testing is now practically complete. I’m guessing that they are in production right now with a probable February release. HPFP Upgrade is a relatively new (to me) company that focuses on the fueling system for various direction injection cars.

There’s been a good deal of anticipation regarding this product. Any product that can help with the FSI’s follower problem is welcome. The company states that it has achieved an increase in durability through the use of hard chroming. By creating a surface with less friction, there is less wear between the follower and cam. Testing supposedly confirms their claims. In addition to the new surface material, the oil flow holes were relocated to the sides. Information is limited right now as the company has yet to officially release the product.

Early Production Photos – Note the revised oiling hole locations

Of course, the product is untested by the mass public and details such as warranty have yet to be hashed out. There are still unanswered questions. How will the relocation of the oil holes affect things and how durable will the follower and hard chrome finish really be in real life application? HPFP Upgrade asserts that the the new finish is much tougher than the OEM DLC coated follower and slicker as well. They also say that the relocation of the oiling holes also has nothing but positive effects, although their reasoning is yet to be seen. The company seems to have done its homework, field testing a few units with favorable results. So far better than another company that just made the follower thicker and omitted the DLC coating…*cough*kmd*cough*. The design is superficially similar to followers used by Mazda.

I’m following this product quite closely and will probably try it out when it does finally get released.

Here’s a thread on the MKV forum with a few details but it unfortunately turns into a flame war in a page or so. Upgraded FSI Cam Follower

If you do end up getting this in a month or two, let everyone know what you think of it in the comments.

Camshaft and Cam Follower Warranty Extension

 

In addition to the pcv and intake manifold motor, Volkswagen also extended the warranty on the camshaft, cam follower and high pressure fuel pump to 120,000 miles or 10 years. As before, they will reimburse any out of pocket expenses related to failure of any of these components provided you have proof of payment and repair. Keep in mind this does not cover replacing followers, only components that have failed or have insufficient hardening. Look through the following letter and see what applies to you.For more information, check out my other posts:Cam Follower Camshaft and Cam Follower Warranty Extension

Camshaft and Cam Follower Warranty Extension

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year everybody! 2012 is here and it’s going to be a good one!

Just a few quick updates for this post…

First things first, sorry for the extreme lack of updates, the MKV front is getting a little older and a little quieter. That’s alright though, the MKV generation of cars has been holding up pretty well. The FSI follower problem has been troublesome for a lucky few and there are various small sensor/peripheral problems (thrust sensor, low pressure fuel pump, pcv and diverter valves etc.)  that owners have had to deal with but overall, the cars have been robust. Maintenance just needs to be kept up to date. I recently rolled past 108,000 miles and the car runs great.

Still coming for the month of January:

The recently mentioned aftermarket cam follower is still awaiting final finishing but the company states that it should be released as soon as this month. This follower is supposed to provide 3x the life of the OEM follower by using a different surface treatment (hard chroming). If the product lives up to its promises, FSI owners can rest just a little bit easier about their cam follower issues.

The Koni Yellow Dampers are holding up well and I think I finally got the rebound settings perfect for the stock springs. When you have adjustable dampers, it’s almost impossible to just pick a setting and not fiddle with them. They tempt you at every corner. I’ll do a write up with the settings soon.

November – Quick Update

Sorry it’s been so long since I’ve written a post, things have been a little quiet on the MKV front. My car is in a place where I like everything on it so I’ve been leaving it alone. The platform is getting older but that doesn’t mean new things aren’t being developed! There are a few particular developments that I want to talk about regarding fueling and cam follower improvements. One company has decided to research and produce a replacement follower that should all but eliminate excessive wear from this part. It has not been released yet but is due to show up in December. I’ll have more information as it becomes available.

Hot Weather Fuel Cuts

1K0 919 051 CL

Since the weather is getting warmer again, some of the older MKV’s may begin to experience failure/overheating of the low pressure fuel pump.  I had this problem last summer. This issue often comes up in hot weather and long distance driving.  The low pressure fuel pump begins to overheat and then cuts out, starving the high pressure fuel pump. Acceleration is completely cut and you have to pull over or slow down.

If you’re experiencing fuel cuts in the heat or during long distance driving, take a look here for some more information. You may need to replace your in-tank fuel pump with the latest version.

Cam Follower 45,000 Mile Checkup

Second Cam Follower, around 45,000 miles on it. The car has almost 100,000 miles now.

I pulled the cam follower to check how it was doing.  It’s been quite a while since I last checked.  I’m estimating the total mileage on this to be about 45,000 miles.  This is only the second cam follower this car has seen.  Nonetheless, the wear is excellent and I’m popping this one back in.  I’ll check back in 10,000 miles, which this should easily last.  The DLC coat is still not completely worn through in the center.

Cam Follower Warranty Extension

Good news everybody! VW of America has decided to extend the cam follower, high pressure fuel pump, and intake camshaft warranty to 120,000 miles or 10 years. I received a letter in the mail. It took a while but VW finally did the right thing.

I’ll load the letter once I get it scanned. documents added below

Here are a few links related to the cam follower problem:

Cam Follower 1

Cam Follower 2

Cam Follower 3

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Intermittent Fuel Cuts – Low Pressure Fuel Pump

August 17, 2011 Update: 

It seems that the CL part number has now been superseded by 1K0 919 051 DB. I don’t know what the changes are or if the change was spurred by a problem with the CL number. Info from this thread.

As the 5th generation cars begin to age in the U.S., a couple of newer problems are beginning to rise up.  One really annoying problem is the low pressure fuel pump cutting out intermittently.  It leads to the high pressure fuel pump starving of fuel and then the engine loses power for a few seconds.  Utterly annoying and it can be dangerous if you’re traveling at a good rate of speed and happen to slow down in the far left.  It can be difficult to get onto the shoulder.  It tends to happen during a long drive in hot weather.

A newer updated pump (Part Number : 1K0 919 051 CL) is supposed to help with this problem.  This is not located in the engine bay, unlike the high pressure fuel pump.  This one sits underneath the rear seats.  It is easy enough to replace and there are a few DIY’s floating around.  Here’s a good one from the Golfmkv forums – In-tank fuel pump replacement

1stvwparts.com has the best price that I’ve seen so far at $180 dollars plus shipping.

Before changing the fuel pump though, you might want to check whether your thrust sensor has been updated to the latest revision.  This sensor sits on the passenger side of the high pressure fuel pump.  06E906051K is the part number for the newest thrust sensor revision.  If this solves your problem, you’ll have saved around 120 dollars.

06E906051K Thrust Sensor

Post Weekend Updates – Brakes, Sensors and Fuel Pump Edition

I finally got some time to work on the car this weekend.  I was able to do install the speed bleeders, do full flush and bleed with ATE Superblue fluid and finally install the thrust sensor.

Some strange findings on the thrust sensor – I took of the old one only to find out that it was already the updated version.  Dammit.  I hope it was on it’s way out or something.  If you didn’t know already, I was having fuel supply issues on a long trip.  Read all about it here…Click me! I won’t find out until I take another long trip in the heat.

The problem seems to be cropping up in the forums a little more, so at least I know other people have experienced the problem.  There’s still very little information on exactly what is going on.  If anyone knows anything, leave me a comment!

About the speed bleeders… (SB1010S)

They worked perfectly!  That was probably the least trouble I’ve had with bleeding the brakes.  Granted, it would probably be even easier with a pressure bleeder.  These turned out just fine but if you want to spend just a little more, you can get the pressure bleeder and be able to use it with multiple cars.

The ATE Superblue brake fluid is helpful in determining whether you’ve flushed all the old fluid out of the system.  The fluid is, you guessed it, blue.  Once the fluid coming out of the bleeder is blue, you know you’ve flushed all the old crud out.  ATE has an amber colored fluid that you can alternate between flushings to help  you determine if you’ve flushed the Superblue out of the system.  Same specs, just amber.  It’s called Type 200 I believe.  The ATE fluid is a little pricier than store bought but the specs are excellent for a daily driver; 536 degree dry boiling point and 396 wet.

I also re-lubed all the caliper and pad slide points.  I opted to use high temp grease for the back of the pads instead of the tacky silencer stuff.  It might help the pads shift around when they need to instead of tacking them in place.  I’ve been getting an annoying squeal for the past few weeks despite the pads being good still.  Hopefully the the grease will allow the pads to move just enough to eliminate it.  So far so good.

I also did a quick cam follower check to see if anything out of the ordinary, glad to report that after 30,000 + miles on the 2nd cam follower, the DLC coating is barely starting to show some signs of wear, and this is on APR stage 1 software too.  Sweet!

Cam Follower Troubleshooting

There still seems to be a good number of people who are unaware of the cam follower problems.  Not all cars have the problem, and some may never have it.  BUT it will kill your wallet if you find out yours is on the edge of dying and you are out of warranty.

There is no set of factors that directly contributes to the wear.  If you have the A cam, there is a TSB out to replace your cam with the properly hardened B cam.  VW will only replace the cam if the car is throwing codes or a check engine light or if they physically see the damage.  The problem can still occur but having the B cam reduces the risks.  I have had no problems and as far as the internet world is concerned, much of Europe seems to be just fine.  The number of factors affecting the rate of follower wear is just enormous.  It could be oil standards, fuel quality, driving habits, maintenance, and so on.  The design has been remedied on the newer TSI engines with a roller follower.  This design should have been used in the first place instead of the flat tappet style used on the FSI.

Here are a few links to check out:

Cam follower check

Maintenance Page

A smooth unblemished cam

The most common symptom of a cam follower in trouble is a fuel cut.  This feels like someone just took the gas pedal out from under you.  It does NOT feel good.  This doesn’t always come up with check light or code.  Which leads us to the most obvious signs. These codes may come up when scanned.

P0087 Fuel Rail / System Pressure – Too Low
P1093 Fuel Trim 2, Bank 1 Malfunction
P2293 Fuel Pressure Regulator 2 Performance

If these come up, check your follower.  These can be symptomatic of other problems as well so don’t panic yet.  Check  the thrust sensor on the high pressure fuel pump.  Your low pressure fuel pump could also be on its way out.  These are all much cheaper problems than the cam situation.  Best case scenario is that the ecu just glitched.  Worst case, destroyed cam, follower and fuel pump. If you have never checked your cam follower and you have any kind of mileage, do so now.  Don’t count on the dealer to check for you.  It won’t destroy itself in 5000 miles but check every other oil change.  If wear looks minimal every time you check, you can lessen the intervals.

The picture on the left shows a follower with normal wear patterns.  You can replace it if you wish but it can probably go a few more miles.  The part number is 06D 109 309 C. 1stvwparts has excellent pricing.  Note that the edges still have some of the DLC coating on it.  If yours does not, then that is absolutely time to change.  I haven’t seen too many that look so clean.   If your foll0wer looks like the picture on the right, sob quietly and then proceed to the dealership, if under warranty, and hope for the best.  Or if not under warranty, prepare to feel a world of hurt.  It’s going to be pricey.  Replacement of the cam is recommended to be done at a shop or qualified service center.  It is not really a job for the weekend mechanic as it needs specialized tools.

~57000 miles

~57000 miles

destroyed

Unknown mileage, center punched out