Revised OEM PCV and Crankcase Breather Tube

06F129101P Front Detail

In my current quest to return some parts back to OEM spec, I’ve recently purchased the latest revision PCV components.  The latest revision PCV valve is “P” with the part number 06F129101P.  There is also another revision of the rear breather tube, part number 06F103215B.  The valves in the latest revisions seem much stronger compared to my old “G” revision.  The check valves are now spring loaded instead of free moving.  I don’t know when they switched to the spring loaded valves because I completely skipped over the 2 or 3 other revisions.

06F129101P Valve Detail

If you’re wondering why I went back to stock, I wanted to remove the catchcan I’ve been running.  An intake manifold teardown by a forum member  revealed that catch cans do little to aid in preventing the intake valve deposits inherent to direct injection engines.  I have also been thinking about the lack of intake vacuum working on the crankcase.  In the catch can setups, vacuum is sourced from intake air moving over the rear breather tube exit.  I think it is a max of 3″ of mercury according to BSH and this occurs in the higher rpms under boost.  At lower rpms, actual vacuum may be much lower.  Too little flow or stagnant flow through the valve cover may allow the blow-by gasses to start forming deposits.  I’ve noticed a little grime building up around the oil cap area, despite the regular oil changes.  The accumulation of these blow by gasses can contaminate oil and deteriorate it much faster as well.  Another side effect of routing all gasses through the rear breather tube seems to be, ironically, more oil in the charge pipes.  If a recirculation type catch can does not catch all the vapors, the rest end up condensing in charge pipes and intercooler.  The stock system sends them directly to the intake manifold to be burned off.  The way the stock system works, it only reroutes vapors through the charge piping and intercooler under boost.  When I installed my throttle pipe, a good amount of oil came pouring out of the pipes.

06F103215B Check Valve Detail

Now oil vapor in the in the intake charge is detrimental to performance.  This is where a catch can does help.  Oil vapor can effectively reduce the octane level of the intake charge and lead to more knock, which would then decrease performance.  I haven’t noticed a performance difference since I switched back to the stock system but then again, my car isn’t exactly a horsepower monster.  It is a compromise situation but after many miles of thought, I’d rather have the stock system deal with the evacuation of the crankcase gasses.  The stock pcv system flows a lot and I don’t think some of the catch cans flow enough.

06F129101P Rear Detail

The stock pcv valves have not been models of reliability, which is one of the reasons catch catch cans have sold so well. Modified and stock cars alike can blow through them.  These newer parts are now several revisions deep and they seem to be much more robust pieces.  The rear check valve in the breather tube looks much better.  The front pcv check valves have a more positive engagement compared to the “G” revision I compared it to.  I guess only time will tell!

06F103215B

Advertisements

Revised OEM PCV and Breather Tube Part Numbers

06F129101P Front PCV Valve Detail

The 2.0T FSI’s pcv system has gone through several revision changes.  Earlier valves failed rather easily, causing boost pressure to creep into the crankcase.  Checkvalves would leak and pressure diaphragms would rip.  Symptoms include oil coming out of the valve cover gaskets or oil cap, reduced gas mileage and power or increased oil consumption.  An unsteady idle is another symptom and severe cases will cause a code to be set.  This latest one seems to be a bit more robust than previous versions.  The check valves are spring loaded now instead of free floating for more positive engagement.  If you want to stay stock here are the latest part numbers.

The latest pcv system part numbers are 06F129101P for the front pcv valve and 06F103215B for the rear breather tube with check valve.  The 06F129101P part number only works on rear breather tubes that have a built in check valve.  Certain VIN’s / model years have breather tubes that do not have rear check valves.  The only way to be sure it to pull it off and check for the valve.  Here’s some excellent information for replacing the PCV valve and breather tube.  The link also shows the Eurojet check valve solution so just ignore it if you are not going that route.

06F103215B Rear Breather Tube with Check Valve

Hot Weather Fuel Cuts

1K0 919 051 CL

Since the weather is getting warmer again, some of the older MKV’s may begin to experience failure/overheating of the low pressure fuel pump.  I had this problem last summer. This issue often comes up in hot weather and long distance driving.  The low pressure fuel pump begins to overheat and then cuts out, starving the high pressure fuel pump. Acceleration is completely cut and you have to pull over or slow down.

If you’re experiencing fuel cuts in the heat or during long distance driving, take a look here for some more information. You may need to replace your in-tank fuel pump with the latest version.

BSH Throttle Pipe – Review

BSH Throttle Pipe

Overview

The BSH throttle pipe replaces the stock piping from the intercooler to the throttle body.  It has a provision for two water-meth nozzles and a noise pipe connection.  Block-off plugs are provided if you do not need the water-meth bungs or the noise pipe connection.  This is a high quality piece and it really shows how far BSH’s manufacturing methods have come.  The powdercoat is a nice wrinkle black finish, the welds, although still external, are much more uniform and the whole piece feels like quality.  Nice job BSH.

Installation

Installation was not too hard. You’ll find all sorts of stories online about how difficult it was to install the throttle body pipe but I didn’t really find it too hard.  It took me about 1 1/2 hours working at a moderate pace.  I followed the instructions for the Neuspeed throttle pipe since BSH includes ZERO instructions in the package.  I did not find any instructions on BSH’s website either.  While not a show stopper, it’s just an annoyance that really shouldn’t be there.  The best way to remove the stock throttle pipe is to undo all the necessary bolts and then remove the piece from the bottom.  I don’t even know if you can remove the pipe from the top.  You will have very little clearance to do so but it is completely possible to remove it without forcing anything.

Fitting in the BSH piece is just the opposite of removing the stock piece.  It’s easier to attach the silicone tubing to the throttle body first and then to install the BSH pipe from the bottom.  It helps to lube up the silicone with a little bit of motor oil.  It’ll become clearer as you go through the install process.  Clearance is very tight, as you can see.  There is only one mounting point on the BSH pipe.  I don’t have a picture of it but it attaches to the bolt that holds a coolant line.  Once I get down there for an oil change, I’ll take a picture.

Once everything is fitted up, double check you clearances and make sure you won’t hit the fans.  The engine does rock when you accelerate.  Check to see if you reconnected the MAP sensor and all the clamps are adequately tightened.

Driving impressions

BSH does not claim hp gains with this pipe.  They advertise it as an easy way to add water-meth spray nozzles and block off the noise pipe.  They also claim increased airflow and better engine response by virtue of the larger diameter piping.  I think I can fully agree with the engine response claim.  The biggest improvement I felt was in the midrange.  The engine just feels livelier, punchier for lack of a better word and feels much less restrained when applying the throttle.  Definitely a lot more fun to kick around town.

Overall

I really like what this pipe  has added to the character of the engine.  To me it makes driving the car even more fun.  It’s not a massive fundamental change but I noticed the change in response immediately.  It is a nice option if you want to have a reliable method of installing a water-meth spray system, but I can’t really comment on it because I don’t run water-meth.  The price hovers around 170 dollars and is available from the usual vendors.  A search on Google shopper will find the lowest price.  I really like this part and it would probably complement other intake mods very well.  I am running the stock intake and still found gains.  It is currently the best throttle pipe on the market as it offers a variety of configurations at the same price point as the others.  Recommended.

Akebono Euro Ceramics

Akebono Euro Ceramic Pads

Overview

The Akebono Euro Ceramics are an OEM type replacement ceramic pad.  They promise less dusting and no noise when compared with regular replacement pads.

Driving Impressions

The Euro Ceramics are very progressive feeling brake pads.  Pedal pressure translates well into brake force.  In other words, I know how much pressure to apply and how much braking I’ll be getting in return.  The Hawk HPS pads I had before were annoying in this aspect.  They were not linear, grabbing slowly at first and then all of a sudden too much.  The Euro Ceramics on the other hand are pretty progressive and have better cold bite than the HPS pads.  Stopping power is good, just  a tad less than the HPS.  If the HPS pads were a 10, the Euro Ceramics are an 8.  Still great but the HPS pads haul you down impressively.  Still good for a briskly driven daily driver.  The brake pedal feels better, slightly firmer than the HPS pads.

Noise is nonexistent.  I have yet to hear these pads squeal or make any noise.  Noise was the main reason I got rid of the HPS pads.  One of the sets developed a squeal that refused to go away.  Anti squeal goops, greases, or adhesives all failed.  I tried reseating them, regreasing the pins, sanding down a new surface; nothing worked.  The Akebono pads have turned out great in this department.  The Akebono pads also have much less noticeable dust.  They still release dust, but it is a much lighter color, practically invisible from a distance.  Up close, it is a light almost yellowish dust, hard to see on silver wheels but maybe a problem on darker colors.

Overall

I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend the Akebono Euro Ceramic pads as an alternative to the OEM pads.  They have good, if not great stopping power, are rather clean dusting and have little to no noise.  While they don’t have the pure stopping force of the HPS pads, I like the pedal feel much better.  The Akebono’s are much more progressive and provide an even keel response from a cold stop to warm up.  This gives me much more confidence while braking as compared with the slightly better friction properties of the HPS pads.  I purchased these pads from Amazon.com, part number EUR1107 for the front, and EUR1348 for the rears.  It’ll cost you about 120-130 dollars for the set.

Product Reviews

I’ve been slowly reworking over some of the older product posts and turning them into more informative reviews.  They’re being compiled on one page.  Click this link or the link at the top of the header to check them out!

Tinted Tail Lights By Darcness

Now the deal on the OEM smoked tail lights is great.  However, if you want something a little darker, you’re going to have to go somewhere else.  There is a guy on the MKV forums that goes by “Darcness” who can tint tail lights to your preferred shade and even do the amber turn signal modification while he’s at it.  The amber turn signal DIY is actually his own doing as well.  He does excellent work, as attested to by several forum members, and this huge thread.

Not my car, but featuring his work

I do not have his tail lights nor have I ordered from him, but I like what he does.  He does quality work.  He has many satisfied customers and is a forum sponsor.  In general, a good guy.  Check out that thread if you’re interested in purchasing a set of custom tail lights from him.  Basically, you pay for your tails plus a deposit.  You receive your tails, install them and then send back your old set and your deposit is refunded.

If you need some tail light work, send him a private message on GolfMKV.com under user name “Darcness”.  He can elaborate more on pricing.

 

Disclaimer: Please understand that if a situation or something arises, I am in no way tied to “Darcness”.  I cannot help you in transactions with him.  This post is just to let others know of a forum recommended source for tinted tail lights.